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Markets & trends
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Skincare: the future of personalisation is in the lab, Canadean says

Personal skincare made in the lab to perfectly match each individual customer is predicted to become a big trend in skincare right now. In a new survey, market research firm Canadean investigates the market potential of personal skincare in the UK.

Many skincare brands have already responded to the need for individualism by offering their customers in-store skin consultancies to detect their skin type and match them with the right product. Now the first movers in skincare are taking personalisation to a new level when they offer laboratory tests and individually labelled products.

Consumers are ready

A new survey from Canadean [1] finds that many British customers are prepared to go far to find their personal skin cream match: 45% of UK adults say that they are interested in the laboratory approach to personal skincare, and many of these say that they are prepared to go to a specialised laboratory, and would even prefer this compared to getting their personal product from other channels such as department stores or filling out online questionnaires.

I.C. Lab offers consumers individually-made skincare products, produced with personal skin characteristics in mind.

I.C. Lab offers consumers individually-made skincare products, produced with personal skin characteristics in mind.

Of those interested in personalised care products, 54% say they are ready to provide blood, skin and hair samples to be tested in a laboratory, 51% would be interested in giving a DNA swab samples, and 52% would like to go to a medical dermatologist consultation.

Growth potential for the beauty industry

Preparing skincare products according to individual recipes takes time, and consumers will most likely have to wait to get their products made. According to the survey, consumers are prepared to wait for up to a month to receive their product. 59% of consumers are also prepared to pay a premium for such products.

Over 22 % of skincare consumption by volume globally is driven by individualism, and with the development of new technologies, manufacturers have opportunities to take it to a whole new level. Factors such as allergies, genetic predisposal, nutrition, climate and exposure to the sun are all individual needs perfect for tailoring,” explains Veronika Zhupanova, analyst at Canadean.

Pioneers of individually-made skincare products

In Russia, I.C. Lab offers consumers individually-made skincare products, produced with personal skin characteristics in mind. The customers are invited to the laboratory, where their skin is tested, and in a few weeks they can collect the product made specifically for them that not only satisfy the needs of the skin, but it also features their surname on the package. At the moment, the brand is presented in Russia and the Ukraine. The cream is set at a premium price: Costs 3000 RUB for 15ml eye-cream (around 50 pounds or 63 euros).

I.C. Lab offers consumers individually-made skincare products, produced with personal skin characteristics in mind.

I.C. Lab offers consumers individually-made skincare products, produced with personal skin characteristics in mind.

According to Canadean, the trend is also picking up slowly in the UK where Nivea launched last July its ‘Face Facts Boutique’ for the new Cellular Anti-Age range. The rolling booth was set up in a number of UK shopping centres providing consultations using a new technology to analyse the customers’ skin, advise on the best skincare routine and answer any skin-aging questions.

Source: Canadean

Footnotes

[1] Canadean surveyed 2,000 British consumers in June 2014 about their attitudes to personalised personal care products.

© 2014 - Premium Beauty News - www.premiumbeautynews.com
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